Get updates on email:

email:

name:

add me

Please select period

The ACIS is a system for reporting of incidents when humanitarian organizations have their access to the beneficiaries restricted. This includes incidents such as a demand for a body search, denial of access, consfiscation of IDs and so forth
Incident Tracking reports(ACIS)
21 Oct 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | September 2008

In September, UN staff experienced deterioration with respect to access compared to August. There were 62 access incidents reported, as compared to the 37 reported in August. The number of staff-hours lost due to checkpoint delays almost doubled to 1256 (as compared to the previous month’s 641 staff-hours lost).

16 Kb [ English ]
13 Oct 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | August 2008

In August, though the number of incidents where UN staff experienced delays at checkpoints was roughly half the number in July, the number of staff-hours lost due to delays at checkpoints actually increased slightly to 641--up from 601 staff-hours in July. UN staff continue to avoid the most problematic checkpoints, preferring instead to circumvent or avoid them completely whenever possible

16 Kb [ English ]
20 Aug 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | July 2008

In July, UN staff once again experienced improvement with respect to access in comparison to the previous month. There were 72 access incidents reported in July, as compared to the 108 reported in June. UN staff still avoid the most problematic checkpoints, however, preferring instead to circumvent or avoid them completely whenever possible. The three checkpoints into East Jerusalem from the south were responsible for 43% of the total number of access incidents during the month.

17 Kb [ English ]
17 Jul 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | June 2008

In June, UN staff experienced a slight improvement with respect to access. There were 108 access incidents reported, as compared to the 138 reported in May. UN staff continue to avoid the most problematic checkpoints, preferring instead to circumvent or avoid them completely whenever possible. The three checkpoints into East Jerusalem from the south were responsible for 50% of the total number of access incidents during the month.

17 Kb [ English ]
18 Jun 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | May 2008

The crisis in humanitarian access experienced during March and April 2008 continued in May, as 138 access incidents were reported. In April and March, respectively, there were 181 and 139 incidents reported. The slight decrease in the number of incidents reported in May can likely be attributed to staff members spending less time negotiating access at the most troublesome checkpoints, preferring instead to circumvent or avoid them completely. Avoiding these checkpoints, however, contributes to substantial delay and lost working hours, the effects of which cannot be fully captured in the Monthly Humanitarian Access Incident Report. In May, the three checkpoints into East Jerusalem from the south were responsible for 63% of the total number of access incidents.

15 Kb [ English ]
02 May 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | April 2008

The crisis for humanitarian access that was evident in March 2008 continues in April. There were 139 access incidents in March: in April there were 181 incidents reported. There was a reduction by about 30% in staff hours lost in April. This is probably due to staff giving up more quickly and spending less time attempting to negotiate access at troublesome checkpoints. The three checkpoints into East Jerusalem from the south were responsible for 74% of the total number of incidents. In March these checkpoints caused 68% of the access problems. One incident in the total was attributed to action by Palestinian civilians, all the rest were caused by Israeli sources.

16 Kb [ English ]
03 Apr 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | March 2008

Access incidents have risen dramatically in the last two months. This ACIS report for March shows that the number of incidents has tripled since January. The cost to UN agencies in terms of lost staff time has been more than 4000 hours. Almost all the increase is due to a new regime imposed by Israeli police at the checkpoints into East Jerusalem. This is having a serious impact on the ability of UN agencies and other humanitarian organizations to conduct their programmes.

15 Kb [ PDF ]
03 Apr 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | February 2008

The ACIS report summarises West Bank access incidents when UN agencies or NGOs are either refused access, or are delayed in getting access, due to the action of authorities. February shows an increase in incidents of delayed or denied access at the southern checkpoints into East Jerusalem which have been caused by the Israeli authorities at the checkpoints insisting on searching UN cars, a clear breach of the UN Convention on Privileges and Immunities which the Government of Israel is a signatory to. This continues to hamper UN agency staff in conducting their duties.

15 Kb [ PDF ]
05 Feb 2008

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | December 2007

In December, humanitarian agencies reported there had been 47 incidents of delayed or denied access at West Bank checkpoints and flying checkpoints. This is above the 2007 monthly average of 42. Monthly totals ranged from 28 in February to 51 in August with no evident trend for an overall decrease or increase.This report shows that there were a total of 501 incidents for the year 2007 which cost humanitarian agencies the equivalent of a total of 450 working days. Incidents at checkpoints continue to hinder the operations of humanitarian agencies.

15 Kb [ PDF ]
05 Dec 2007

Incident Tracking report (ACIS ) | November 2007

This ACIS report shows the incidents in November 2007 in which humanitarian agency staff, UN or NGO, reported that they had had access to their beneficiaries delayed or denied.

15 Kb [ PDF ]

About OCHA | Contacts | Site Map | Vacancies

By using this website and the content hereof you agree to our terms of use . Please see our contact pages to make an enquiry. Design :: Gama